Utilize social media for link building and building a brand

If you’re thinking about using a CMS plugin that automatically hyperlinks a certain word every time it appears on your website (i.e. like Wikipedia does), I’d suggest refraining from doing so unless you’re a relatively big brand or if it makes complete sense from a UX perspective. The SEO benefits of social media, in my opinion, should be seen as the by-product of a strong social media strategy, not the core objective. In turn, SEO’s need to understand the wider role social media plays in connecting with an audience at each stage of the buying journey. The only way unethical SEO techniques are ever going to be eradicated is when Google themselves get clever enough to work out how to tweak their algorithm to ensure these tactics no longer work. Don’t get me wrong. Google have come a long way during the past few years in stamping out unethical SEO spam but they are far from ensuring none of it works. As a digital marketer, one of the most frequent questions I get asked is “how do I get traffic to my website?” If you want to link to somebody but you don’t want it to count as a vote (you don’t want to pass link-juice), or you support user-generated content and want to deter spammers, you can use a nofollow link. Google says it discounts the value of those links. I’m not convinced they discount them heavily, but other SEOs are so they seem to deter spammers if nothing else.

Use quotes to locate a specific phrase

Pick a list of words relevant to your business. Then create separate lists of these keywords for each country. Focus on “long-tail keywords” -- keywords that are very specific to your business and the products/services you offer. For example: marketing is a broad keyword that will be hard to get traffic for, and inbound marketing software is a long-tail keyword with less competition that will be easier to get traffic for. There are a number of ways to get relative monthly search volume, but what remains the easiest is using Google keyword planner (the replacement for the now deprecated keyword tool). Having quality inbound links is thus, a crucial SEO technique that only increases the authority and credibility of your website. There is no evidence that adding a lot of content at one time can hurt a site if the content is of high quality. If you can’t budget for 6 to 12 months of SEO, you might be better off putting that budget somewhere else.

Enable broswer caching

Google can, and does, ignore low relevance links. The worst offenders are generic links (“click here”) and even worse, off-topic links. The world is always changing, and you have to keep up. If you do, the rewards can be great. As you’re developing high-quality content, you’ll need to pay some attention to search engine optimization, or SEO. Your content needs to contain words and phrases that people might type into a search engine. Keyword research can be done using free tools. Setting up Google My Business is a must for your SEO gameplan. It is this that dictates whether your business will claim the space on the right hand side of the SERPs (the Knowledge Panel) when someone searches for your business by name. With SERP space at a premium, owning this piece of real estate when someone searches for your brand is a must. First, stop assuming SEO is dead because the rules changed.

What are sitelinks?

According to SEO Consultant, Gaz Hall: "Keyword relevancy and placement is far more important than frequency. Your keyword or key phrase should appear in the first 100 words of your page, if not the first sentence." Google counts thousands of PhDs as employees. And while its algorithm over the years has been incredibly vulnerable to abuse by spammers, increasingly it’s taking into account the context in which a link appears. So if a consumer hears a message somewhere and then decides to search on Bing to get more information, many times the advertiser isn’t present, and that consumer ends up taking a different path than what the advertiser would have desired. Google is the dominant search engine in many countries, but not all of them. How you optimize your website depends heavily on the target market for that site, and the search engines that (are) the most important in that market. It’s entirely possible that Google actually uses some sort of hidden sliding scale to determine its quality score.

Does more traffic directly imply more revenue?

If you want to achieve a higher ranking on Google and other search engines, you’ll need to get serious about search engine optimization. “SEO” refers to search engine optimization, or the process of optimizing a website so that people can easily find it via search engines like Google. Google has made it apparent that site speed matter in search rankings, and today, with a bigger emphasis on the user experience than ever before, site speed will continue to be a critical ranking factor. Longer URLs tend to look a little more spammy within the search engine results page, and this is amplified if there are a lot of numbers and symbols within them. Search engine optimization is often about making small modifications to parts of your website. When viewed individually, these changes might seem like incremental improvements, but when combined with other optimizations, they could have a noticeable impact on your site's user experience and performance in organic search results.

Link building, of course, is a science in itself

If you don’t know where to submit a guest blog post or what forums would be good to participate on, research where your competitors are going to get links and follow suit. There’s been some debate in the SEO community about whether or not “social signals” can affect your search rankings, and what, exactly, “social signals” are in the first place. This is mostly because Google has both explicitly confirmed and explicitly denied the presence of social signals in its search ranking algorithm. The hypothesis is that articles that receive a high number of social media shares will get an additional boost in perceived authority -- which makes sense on paper, but the empirical evidence varies. A small dip in search traffic is no immediate cause for concern (it may just be a temporary drop in consumer interest); but if that dip lasts for more than a few weeks or turns into a more significant drop, you’ll need to troubleshoot the problem to see what’s going on. Mobile traffic is important. People are searching and reading on their mobile devices more than ever. What does that mean for your copy? Do you need to write differently if you’re aiming at a ‘mobile’ audience? How do you tackle copywriting for mobile? It’s OK to do promotion to tell people about your content, but if you can only get links by offering money to people or other big incentives, then you’re likely doing it wrong. One of the best ways to get links is to publish original research. That’s not that hard to do. Find out a question that people have in your industry and then do something to answer that question with data.